Saturday, May 21, 2011

O child, do not go out!

 
                                                          from a drawing by Surendranath Ganguli


It's been raining out, spontaneous, perennial and sublime. The blessed air is delighted when tiny drops of water blend in its hues, see it has been intoxicated, it's maddening, it's dancing. The twinkle of the raindrops is making me forget everything else. Now, I can't wait to enjoy the beautiful, clear heaven outside..
Here, a famous poem by Rabindranath Tagore "The Rainy Day" for you.



Sullen clouds are gathering fast over the black fringe of the

forest.
O child, do not go out!
The palm trees in a row by the lake are smiting their heads
against the dismal sky; the crows with their dragged wings are
silent on the tamarind branches, and the eastern bank of the river
is haunted by a deepening gloom.
Our cow is lowing loud, ties at the fence.
O child, wait here till I bring her into the stall.
Men have crowded into the flooded field to catch the fishes
as they escape from the overflowing ponds; the rain-water is
running in rills through the narrow lanes like a laughing boy who
has run away from his mother to tease her.
Listen, someone is shouting for the boatman at the ford.
O child, the daylight is dim, and the crossing at the ferry
is closed.
The sky seems to ride fast upon the madly rushing rain; the
water in the river is loud and impatient; women have hastened home
early from the Ganges with their filled pitchers.
The evening lamps must be made ready.
O child, do not go out!
The road to the market is desolate, the lane to the river is
slippery. The wind is roaring and struggling among the bamboo
branches like a wild beast tangled in a net.



Rabindranath Tagore, sobriquet Gurudev was a Bengali poet, novelist, musician and playwright who reshaped Bengali literature and music. As author of Gitanjali with its "profoundly sensitive, fresh and beautiful verse", he was the first non-European to be awarded the Nobel Prize for Literature (1913). His poetry in translation was viewed as spiritual, and this together with his mesmerizing persona gave him a prophet-like aura in the west. His "elegant prose and magical poetry" still remain largely unknown outside the confines of Bengal.

4 comments:

Jitesh Khurana said...

and his contribution to national anthem three asian countries... definitely a great poet..

Monika said...

I admire the great man so much. This poem is from "The crescent moon", a prose poems book. He so beautifully explores the simplest pleasures of daily living that you can't stand without being mesmerized.

Susie Swanson said...

I love this and how he covered it all the way he did.. I love your profile, the way you have put it up.. I wish I had a way with words like you. You are sooo talented..Susie

Susie Swanson said...

Hats off to you and your great creativity. You put it better than I could have ever, on mine. Thank you so much for the beautiful words... Susie